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Le meilleur petit goémon!

Le petit goémon (dulse) est une une algue marine qui croît dans l’Atlantique Nord et dans le Pacifique du Nord-Ouest. Elle y pousse attachée à la pierre par un "crampon". On récolte cette algue depuis des centaines d’années et elle est utilisée communément en Irlande et au Canada Atlantique comme aliment et médicament. 

On trouve le petit goémon dans plusieurs magasins de produits de santé ou bien dans les marchés de poissons; on peut aussi la commander directement des distributeurs locaux. 

L’Île de Grand Manan, dans la baie de Fundy au Canada, est reconnue pour le meilleur petit goémon à cause de sa géographie.

Laurie Murison décrit la cueillette du petit goémon, sa transformation et nous offre un tableau détaillé de sa valeur nutritive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Best Dulse!

Laurie Murison
Grand Manan Whale & Research Director
January 2001

 

ulse (Palmaria palmata) is a red seaweed that grows in the North Atlantic and Northwest Pacific oceans attached to rocks by a "holdfast". It has been harvested for hundreds of years and is commonly used in Ireland and Atlantic Canada both as food and as medicine. It can be found in many health food stores or fish markets or can be ordered directly from local distributors.

Map


Grand Manan Island in the Bay of Fundy, Canada, is known for the best dulse because of the geography of the island. On the western side of the island, high cliffs shade the intertidal zone--protecting dulse from bright sunlight during the morning. "Dark Harbour Dulse" named after a protected salt water pond on the western side of the island, is darker, thicker and more flavourful than dulse growing elsewhere, including the eastern side of Grand Manan and the other islands in the Grand Manan Archipelago.

Dulse grows in the intertidal zone (the area between high tide and low tide) up to the mid-tide portion. Fronds may vary in color from rose to reddish-purple, and range from about 20 to 40 cm (8" to 16"). Usually from June through September, it is picked by hand at the low water mark when the tides are the lowest--"spring tides". Dulse grows quickly in the summer and the same shores may be picked every two weeks--corresponding to the new and full moons. The pickers clamber over slippery rocks, tearing off only a portion of the dulse leaving the holdfasts and part of the fronds. This allows the plant to continue growing. Dulse pickers often travel along the shores in dories, wooden, flat-bottomed boats that can be safely landed on the rocky shores. Traditionally rowed, most dories now have small out-board motors. They may use headlamps (similar to the ones miners use) when the low tide occurs at night. Periwinkles and other seaweed grazers can reduce the quality of the dulse by eating holes in the fronds. Extended exposure to sunlight and heat can bleach dulse completely white, further reducing the quality.

Dulse on Rocks
(photo: Laurie Murison)

The dulse is brought to drying fields (or spreading grounds) and put through a shaker to remove shells pieces, etc. Spreading grounds are located in full sun and usually have a gravel or cobble base with netting spread over the top. The fronds are spread thinly on the netting, left to dry for the day, turned once and then rolled into large bales to be packaged or mechanically ground. In the heat of summer, dulse is sometimes spread at night to prevent burning from the overheated cobble base. Dulse is not dried when it is foggy or there is a chance of rain, since both will prevent proper drying. Freshly picked dulse can be kept for a short time in porous sacks suspended in sea water until the weather clears. Too long and the dulse must be discarded.

Sun-dried dulse is eaten as is or is ground into flakes or a powder. It can also be pan fried quickly (garlic butter optional) into tasty chips, baked in the oven covered with cheese then add salsa, or microwaved briefly for a crispy treat. It can also be used in soups, chowders, sandwiches and salads, or added to bread/pizza dough. Fresh dulse can be eaten directly off the rocks before sun-drying. A variety of dulse is cultivated in Nova Scotia and marketed as Sea Parsley, sold fresh in the produce section. Fresh dulse can also be pressed in a plant press and mounted on cards or as a collage, mixed with other seaweeds or plants and flowers. The reddish translucent, dried plants make an attractive specimen. They should be protected from direct sunlight when displayed.

Dark Harbour
"Dark Harbour"


Dulse is a good source of dietary requirements. A handful will provide more than 100% of the daily amount of Vitamin B6, 66% of Vitamin B12, a day's supply of iron and fluoride (great for strong teeth), and it is relatively low in sodium and high in potassium. The following chart shows the details of the nutritive value of dulse.


Element

Percentage

Dietary amounts

Protein

25.3

21.5g/100g

Carbohydrate

44.2

44.6g/100g

Fat

3.8

1.7g/100g

Calories

-

264/100g

Mineral salts

26.7

-

Sodium

0.47

1740mg/100g

Potassium

7.11

7820mg/100g

Calcium

2.5

213mg/100g

Iodine

0.008

5.2mg/100g

Iron

0.15

33.1mg/100g

Magnesium

0.22

271mg/100g

Copper

0.026

0.376mg/100g

Zinc

0.0041

2.86mg/100g

Nickel

0.0072

-

Cobalt

0.000013

-

Fluorine

0.0015

5.3mg/100g

Manganese

-

1.14mg/100g

Molybdenum

0.000031

-

Silica

0.6

-

Chromium

Trace

0.150mg/100g

Strontium, Vanadium, Titanium

Trace

-

Vitamin A

-

663 I.U.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

-

0.073mg/100g

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

-

1.91mg/100g

Vitamin B3(Niacin)

-

1.89mg/100g

Vitamin B6 (Pyrodoxine)

-

8.99mg/100g

Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin)

-

6.60μg/100g

Vitamin C

-

6.34mg/100g

Vitamin E

-

1.71 I.U.


Other sea plants also harvested in the Bay of Fundy include:

  • Sea Lettuce (Ulva lactuca)
  • Laver or Nori (Porphyra sp.)
  • Irish Moss (Chondrus crispus)
  • Kelp (Laminaria longicruris)
  • Rock Weed or Knotted Wrack (Ascophyllum nodosum)