L'écorégion de Shepody-
Chignecto


Tout en nous offrant une visite guidée de l'écorégion de Shepody-Chignecto de la côte de Fundy, Mary Majka nous propose que cette région soit protégée contre le développement commercial et qu'elle soit incorporée dans la stratégie provinciale sur les aires protégées. Cet article, accompagné par des photos remarquables et une touche personnelle, nous amène aussi proche qu'on peut l'être de marcher sur les fameuses plages de Fundy à partir de son ordinateur.

 

 

 

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Protecting the Fundy Coast?

Mary Majka
March 1998

or a long time now, the idea of having a protected natural area in my part of the province has occupied my thoughts. Recent proposals by the provincial government pointing in that direction have rekindled my interest. Just think about making a relatively large area of the Fundy coast designated and protected from undesirable developments, while still permitting the local population to continue their traditional activities such as hunting, fishing, gathering greens and hiking.

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"Just think about making a relatively large area of the Fundy coast designated and protected..."
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(Photo: Mary Majka)

The area I'm thinking of is near my home in Mary's Point and has already been afforded some protection. However, it has been done in "bits and pieces" ,not tied together, and therefore vulnerable to outside influences and/or encroachments from the neighboring unprotected areas.



Most of this area is in the hands of various governmental jurisdictions. The accompanying map's shaded sections show the managed, i.e. protected, lands that I'll refer to as the "Shepody-Chignecto Ecoregion.  I will take a reader on an imaginary walk through this area, we'll start from the famous Hopewell Rocks in the east and continue westward towards Fundy National Park. What we would encounter along the way would truly amaze and thrill a visitor, fascinate naturalists and scientists, not to mention inspiring the photographers and painters that would venture there.

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"Rocky cliffs and headlands interspersed with curving beaches, tidal creeks, mud flats and marshes..."
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(Photo: Mary Majka)


Rocky cliffs,  headlands interspersed with curving beaches, tidal creeks, mud flats and marshes would each offer a great diversity of marine and terrestrial wildlife. Most of the features of this ecosystem are intimately connected with the high tides of the Bay of Fundy. Such as the mud shrimp (Corophium volutator), the very impressive flights of migrating shorebirds, the nesting Bald Eagles and Peregrine Falcons, or the very unique saltwater lakes which harbor mussels, flounders, and other marine creatures. Beside those rarities, a wealth of birds, mammals and plants enhance this coastal land and still remain wild and untouched.

In a few of these places I would envision the protected area extending one or two kilometers offshore to reach some unique features. I would also like to include the waters of the bay, its very extensive mud flats as well as the small but unique Grindstone Island. In my opinion, now is the time to see that this portion of our province, sparsely populated and often inaccessible by road, should be afforded this protection.

Mary Majka
RR # 2, 435 Mary's Point Road,
Albert, New Brunswick E0A 1A0
CANADA (45-43 N, 64-40 W)
Internet: MarysPt@nbnet.nb.ca