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Magaguadavic River Project, studying the interaction of wild and farmed salmon
(photos: ASF)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Information

(Area Code: 506)

Dr. Fred Whoriskey, Jr. 
Tel: 529-1039, 
Fax: 529-4985,
Email

Jonathan Carr
Tel: 529-1385, 
Fax: 529-4985, 
Email

Tom Moffatt
Tel: 529-1022, 
Fax: 529-4438,
Email

Atlantic Salmon Federation
P. O. Box 5200, St. Andrews, NB E5B 3S8, www.asf.ca 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Research Initiatives of the
Atlantic Salmon Federation


Fred Whoriskey
The Atlantic Salmon Federation
April
, 2001

he Atlantic Salmon Federation (ASF) was founded 53 years ago, and is an organization dedicated to the conservation and wise management of the wild Atlantic salmon.

At sea smolt tracking program


(photo: ASF)


The Federation is made up of a variety of different departments. We have divisions responsible for fundraising, membership services, and administration. The Communications Unit produces our flagship publication, The Atlantic Salmon Journal, looks after our Wilfred M. Carter Atlantic Salmon Interpretive Center, maintains the website, and provides materials for the media. The ASF President and our Governmental Affairs Department work with various levels of government and the public to advocate on behalf of salmon. Finally, the Research and Environment Unit provides technical expertise to intervene on a variety of environmental issues. It is also charged with conducting original, long-term scientific research to help find solutions to the problems facing Atlantic salmon.

Research projects include:

photo: ASFThe Magaguadavic River program is documenting interactions among wild and escaped farmed salmon in the Bay of Fundy region.  It has measured drastic declines in return rates of Atlantic salmon to this river (from more
than 1000 fish in the 1980s, to only 14 in 2000). Currently, we are working with local stakeholders, the Bay of Fundy Salmon Growers Association, and government to develop a recovery program for this river.

The ASF/J.D. Irving salmon optimization program is assessing salmon populations on Clearwater Brook (Miramichi River system) and the Little Main Restigouche River. This program is also developing ways to repair or remove bottlenecks that inhibit salmon production. Counting fences (to monitor adult salmon runs) have been installed at both sites, and we have been stocking reared fry of native origin into the rivers and monitoring their fate. Using an innovative tagging system (PIT tags), graduate student Chris Connell has tracked some of these former fry as they returned as adults to the river and found they headed back to the sites they were stocked into. Very promising results for restoring damaged salmon production rates!

The ASF / J.D. Irving salmon optimization program


(photos: ASF)


Massive mortalities of salmon are occurring in the ocean for unknown reasons. The situation is especially severe in the Bay of Fundy, where salmon populations are on the brink of biological extinction. ASF, in collaboration with Dr. Gilles Lacroix and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, has been conducting groundbreaking research to develop long-lasting sonic tags for small fish. After years of work and several experiments, we will be wiring the Bay in the summer of 2001. We will follow the smolts out into the ocean, and hopefully identify the places where they are dying. Once we know the site of the "murder", hopefully we can link it to a specific cause and find a solution.



At sea smolt tracking program
(photo: ASF)